What is Yoga?


Yoga is a Sanskrit word derived from the root or dhatu “Yuj” which means to connect, join or union. The most important thing is that Yoga with its entire applications and implications is a powerful means to achieve “Moksha.” Moksha is freedom form all bondage, freedom from insecurities, desires, likes-dislikes and all kinds of sufferings. In other words, the end of all human pursuits is everlasting peace and sense of fulfillment. This is possible with the steady and prolonged sincere practice of Yoga. Yoga include every aspect of life. Yoga is like the sun itself, which brightens everything that come into contact with it.


HATHA YOGA

Hatha is usually translated as ‘force’, but in yogic literature the word hatha is a combination of two mantra, ham and tham. ‘Ham’ correspond to Pingla nadi means the energy of the Sun and ‘Tham’ correspond to the energy of Moon. In the context the term hatha yoga means the yoga through which these......

JNANA YOGA

Jnana is a Sanskrit term that means "spiritual knowledge" or "wisdom." It denotes a knowledge of the Self that is inseparable from the Divine, rather than worldly knowledge (vijnana) obtained through learning or experience. Jnana is an inward experience or awareness that one is free from worldly and...

KARMA YOGA

Karma yoga is one of the main paths of yoga that a practitioner can follow. The name comes from the Sanskrit term meaning “action” or “deed.” Therefore, it is the path of action, or selfless service towards others. It is considered by some that practicing karma yoga is the most effective way to develop spiritually....

BHAKTI YOGA

Bhakti yoga is one of the main paths of yoga that a practitioner can follow on the path to self-realization and is the path most followed in India. The name comes from the Sanskrit root word, bhaj, meaning "to adore/worship God." Thus, it is the path of love and devotion. Bhakti is sometimes described as...

RAJA YOGA

Raja yoga is more popularly known as Ashtanga yoga, or the "eightfold path" that leads to spiritual liberation. Ancient Sanskrit texts describe Raja yoga as being the ultimate goal of yoga practice, rather than the physical and mental exercises involved. This means that it is considered the state of peace and contentment that comes with sustained yoga practice and meditation...